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Archive for the ‘bugs’ Category

Are you protecting yourself against the summer biters?

 

Only 22% of people responding to a survey,  purchase products to protect themselves from annoying and biting insects, according to National Pest Management Association (NPMA). If you spend a lot of time in the great outdoors I would suggest purchasing insect repellents to use as an aid in dealing with some real biters. There are some nasty bugs out there, let’s be safe.

One point I found useful about this article was this quote:

“When buying insect repellent always select one containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535,” said Dr. Jorge Parada, medical advisor for the NPMA. “Vector-borne diseases are a growing concern in the U.S., so it is essential that we understand how to protect ourselves and recognize the signs and symptoms of these diseases.”

 

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Photo by PPMA

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Have you ever taken a real close look at a Cactus in bloom?

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The beauty of the cactus is a wonderful spectacle to behold but watch out for those stickers, spines, barbs and the nasty ends. We have some wonderful cacti in Arizona, many bloom at various times of the year to trigger the reproduction mode and they attract many flying insects. People often ask and are concerned about all those flying insects – my answer is simple let them do their job and they will generally leave you alone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I located a honeybee colony in my house and had it removed, now what?

 

Most times if you located it early enough you are probably alright but if its been there for a long time you may have some issues.

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Normally I ask questions and hope for the best but from time to time you never know what might happen. I’ve seen times when not only was there a distinct smell, but there was Wax Moths everywhere. I don’t know how they do it but they got into the house and were flying and flirting around in every room. So here are my tips:

  • Monthly checks of your home during Honeybee season – Africanized Honeybees swarm in Arizona as soon as it becomes warm and wills swarm right up to our mild winters.
  • If you see bees going in and out it is time to call a Pest Management Professional.
  • Keep an eye after the bees have been removed for any signs of leakage. The beeswax and honey will melt and secondary pests will come by for something to eat.
  • Leakage may be inside or outside, pay attention to smells and spotting on walls or ceilings.
  • Honey won’t mold but dead bees might so again pay attention to the smells.

So yesterday we talked about BIG bugs – what about Palo Verde bugs?

 

We have a fairly huge beetle (3-4 inches) here in Arizona called the Palo Verde bug – it is a long horned beetle (named because their antennas are long) and by all standards a good size bug. I can only imagine getting hit by one while riding your motorcycle. It would probably knock you pretty hard, maybe hurting your head or at the very least disorienting you and knocking you off the bike.

The larva are cream colored , typically with a brown head, and feed on the roots of trees, which causes branch dieback. In the wild the most commonly affected tree is the palo verde and just after monsoon the mature insects exit and look for mates. These adults don’t eat and essentially are only interested in mating.

So if you see one, don’t panic and be aware that within a few weeks the adults will die and come out once again during the next monsoon.

It isn’t true is it – BIG bugs?

 

At any time, it is estimated that there are some 10 quintillion (10,000,000,000,000,000,000) individual insects alive.

In the United States, the number of described species is approximately 91,000. The undescribed species of insects in the United States, however, is estimated at some 73,000.

According to Smithsonian Institutions

According to all the reports I have seen or heard it is impossible for insects to grow to extreme sizes due to the lack of oxygen within the environment. That would be my luck, to run into a spider that was over 4 foot. “Giant Megloptera found – Bigger bugs being identified” Make sure you watch both videos, it is wicked scary!
34_Wolf Spider

Photo by PPMA

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