ProBest Pest Management, LLC BBB Request a Quote
Kudzu
Upcoming events
  • Fri
    03
    Oct
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch
  • Fri
    07
    Nov
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch
  • Fri
    05
    Dec
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch

Archive for the ‘bugs’ Category

Some Uberfacts for you.

 

 

I recently found the Twitter site – @Uberfacts and on FaceBook https://www.facebook.com/UberFacts

 

They listed a few facts that are amazing  – There are 14 billion insects for every human on Earth. That equals 980,000,000,000,000,000,000 total on the planet. So if you are concerned about a few how about calling ProBest Pest Management 480-831-9328

 

Kind of scary if you think about it. Picture8

ProBest's Blog - Pest Control
425 W. Guadalupe Road #110 Gilbertaz85233 USA 
 • 480-831-9328

What do you want to know by ProBest Pest Management!

DrBugKVBdidyouknow1

Desert subterranean termites

  • Southwestern U.S. – Colorado and Gila deserts.
  • Lives on grasses, dead cacti, desert plants and can attack fences and other wood products.
  • This termite becomes active during and after the summer rainy season (monsoon), from July to September. This termite does swarm, however I have only seen 2 indoor swarms and generally swarms at dusk, after a rain.
  • These termites will openly build very narrow, free-hanging tubes from ceilings, shelves and overhangs. Don’t be surprised if you see tubes as long as six to 12 inches or longer in length. These tubes are often reused by these termites even when there is no feeding activity. They also build tubes over the foundation walls.
  • Generally speaking this termite causes very little damage to homes and buildings. This doesn’t mean that you should ignore them, they will continue to eat your home until you treat for them.

What is the #1 insect related cause of workplace deaths in the U.S.

 

4383 fatal work injuries in 2012 actually down from 2011 which had 4693- topping the list and transportation incidents led the way.

Bees are number one on the list U.S. Labor Department reports. “Bee stings are behind most insect -related deaths for workers.”

 

46_Honey Bee

 

 

 

 

 

 

So a word or two of caution to all of you who trim trees, work in fields or right-of-ways – always know your surroundings. Be diligent and check out what is around or near you, check out the rocks or culverts just as if it were electric lines etc.

 

Bee Safe!

Are you protecting yourself against the summer biters?

 

Only 22% of people responding to a survey,  purchase products to protect themselves from annoying and biting insects, according to National Pest Management Association (NPMA). If you spend a lot of time in the great outdoors I would suggest purchasing insect repellents to use as an aid in dealing with some real biters. There are some nasty bugs out there, let’s be safe.

One point I found useful about this article was this quote:

“When buying insect repellent always select one containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535,” said Dr. Jorge Parada, medical advisor for the NPMA. “Vector-borne diseases are a growing concern in the U.S., so it is essential that we understand how to protect ourselves and recognize the signs and symptoms of these diseases.”

 

SONY DSC

Photo by PPMA

Have you ever taken a real close look at a Cactus in bloom?

20140807_134535_resized_1

 

 

The beauty of the cactus is a wonderful spectacle to behold but watch out for those stickers, spines, barbs and the nasty ends. We have some wonderful cacti in Arizona, many bloom at various times of the year to trigger the reproduction mode and they attract many flying insects. People often ask and are concerned about all those flying insects – my answer is simple let them do their job and they will generally leave you alone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Get the Blog! Its Free!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Share/Bookmark

Audio Welcome
         Audio Welcome
Archives