ProBest Pest Management, LLC BBB Request a Quote
Kudzu
Upcoming events
  • Fri
    05
    Sep
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch
  • Fri
    03
    Oct
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch
  • Fri
    07
    Nov
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch
  • Fri
    05
    Dec
    2014

    Bug Zoo

    10:00 AMChandler Environmental Education Center 4050 E. Ch

Posts Tagged ‘NPMA’

Before you buy your home by NPMA

 

ProBest's Blog - Pest Control
425 W. Guadalupe Road #110 Gilbertaz85233 USA 
 • 480-831-9328

What is an IGR (Insect Growth Regulator)?

 

An IGR is a chemical that inhibits the life cycle of an insect. OK what does that mean, some IGR’s stop insects from molting their skin, while others can cause eggs to be sterile and some can stop the formation of chitin which aids in the construction of the exoskeleton. We often add an IGR into a product designed to kill that insect but for some reason that insect maybe because of the sheer numbers evades our kill. This IGR then acts upon those survivors by interfering with molting, reproduction and/or the break down of their skeleton.

An example of this would be a heavy infestation of German Roaches, our goal is to kill them all but sheer numbers dictate that this probably won’t happen. So if we kill 97-98% the IGR is there to help wrap up the remaining numbers. Many of these IGR’s are labeled as “Reduced Risk” meaning that they target the offending bug while not affecting other good bugs. You can actually use an IGR by itself and not use any pesticide, the kill might take longer but use are reducing the pesticide within that structure (IPM).

There are a few IGR’s that target specific pests, I’m going to mention a few because of their ability to work really well (my opinion). There are some new ones that work well and are constantly being tested for new pests.

Gentrol – Cockroaches, beetles and moths.

Precor – Mosquitoes and fleas.

Picture8

Preventing Asthma And Allergy Symptoms

More than nine out of ten allergists surveyed (97 percent) believe a pest-free home is an important step in preventing asthma and allergy symptoms, according to a recent survey conducted by the Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America (AAFA) supported by a grant from the National Pest Management Association (NPMA).

The AAFA survey of allergists also revealed the following: Press Release

  • Nearly 8 out of 10 allergists surveyed (76 percent) say, aside from dust mites, cockroaches are the most problematic household pest for patients suffering from asthma or allergies. More than half of allergists surveyed (57 percent) rank rodents as the second most problematic, and nearly two-thirds (63 percent) rank stinging insects as third.
  • More than 9 out of 10 allergists surveyed (95 percent) regularly advise their patients to reduce their exposure to pest allergens in their homes.
  • 9 out of 10 allergists surveyed (90 percent) would recommend that a patient with a pest problem consult with a pest management professional.
  • When asked to provide open-ended comments about advice they give to patients who have a sensitivity to cockroach allergen, the most frequent advice cited by allergists surveyed was to contact or hire a pest management professional.
18_American Cockroach on Sponge

Photo by PPMA

Trust A Pro…

April is National Pest Management Month

 

nppm

I was going to start out with the old adage “Have you hugged your Pest Management Professional” but didn’t want to stir any pots. OK I did it anyway, but did you know:

The world needs pest management professionals, guardians of the environment and protectors of public health, property and food. Ever since “The Jungle” was released in 1906 written by Upton Sinclair – the food industry (meat packing industry) has been regulated and scrutinized. There are a few that consider all the work we do as unnecessary but over 1 million die from Malaria each year (caused by mosquitoes) and Bubonic Plague (caused by fleas) still taps our shoe heels each year.

USPlague70_12_611_pxWide

Plague in the United States

Plague was first introduced into the United States in 1900, by rat–infested steamships that had sailed from affected areas, mostly from Asia. Epidemics occurred in these port cities. The last urban plague epidemic in the United States occurred in Los Angeles from 1924 through 1925. Plague then spread from urban rats to rural rodent species, and became entrenched in many areas of the western United States. Since that time, plague has occurred as scattered cases in rural areas. Most human cases in the United States occur in two regions:

  • Northern New Mexico, northern Arizona, and southern Colorado
  • California, southern Oregon, and far western Nevada

Information provided by www.cdc.gov

Get the Blog! Its Free!

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner



Share/Bookmark

Audio Welcome
         Audio Welcome
Archives