All posts in “stung”

Stung

Stung by a bee or ant?

Stung lately? Bee or ant stings are quite painful and I’ll tell you they can hurt. Bee stings can continue to pump venom into the area so it’s very important to remove the stinger quickly. Also important is not to squeeze the venom sac, this could put more venom into your skin.

I recently ran into a product called Stop Ease, it greatly helps to alleviate the pain. Here is some info from the Mayo Clinic on stings. As always check your property monthly, when hiking make sure you are familiar with exit routes. As always BEE careful.

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It’s bee season – are you prepared?

Season, when are the honeybees active?

Spring Season, maybe the Summer. Honeybees here in Arizona can swarm year round. So no big surprise that the owner noticed a lot of honeybees flying in and out from his deck. It was a great idea to save some money, instead of laying concrete they built a deck with wood. The Honeybee’s also thought it was a great idea, so they decided to set up shop and build a nice fortress for their babies. It was all such a great idea until the dog got stung.

Honeybees don’t realize that they are building near or on a deck, they see a nice void and decide to make it home. I think they would rather be higher off the ground but we really don’t have predators like anteaters  or honey badgers in Arizona. The only thing that they wouldn’t like is us, a little noise or commotion and it might trigger them to attack, especially if they are Africanized, more prone to agitation.

Once a month or at the very least check your home and property for signs of a pest infestation – as always Bee Prepared!

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What is the #1 insect related cause of work place deaths in the U.S.

4383 fatal work injuries in 2012 actually down from 2011 which had 4693- topping the list and transportation incidents led the way.

Bees are number one on the list U.S. Labor Department reports. “Bee stings are behind most insect -related deaths for workers.”

 

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So a word or two of caution to all of you who trim trees, work in fields or right-of-ways – always know your surroundings. Be diligent and check out what is around or near you, check out the rocks or culverts just as if it were electric lines etc.

 

Bee Safe!

Does it takes just one sting?

 

Whether its honeybees, wasps, hornets or scorpions its the sting that will get you. I don’t think anyone of us enjoys accidentally getting stung by something but to many it just takes one sting and we go into anaphylactic shock. Until I read this article about the “Canadian Mayor dies after wasp attack” I didn’t or couldn’t remember that one sting might not kill you but the next might trigger that anaphylactic shock. That is why we must all be aware of our surroundings whether hiking, camping or just out for a stroll around your home.

Did you know honeybees have a stinger that is barbed, so one sting and they give up their life for the colony while wasps, hornets and scorpions can continue to sting. Paperwasps sometimes look like they are watching you as walk around or into the path where their nests is. I don’t think it is a death watch its just that they are protecting their nests. So be warned and stay clear if possible.

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Photo by PPMA

What triggers the attack of Africanized Honeybees?

 

Loud noises or vibrations,  sometimes just the smell – maybe aftershave or cologne and for sure don’t throw things. Here is some information from WikiHow at http://www.wikihow.com/Escape-from-Killer-Bees with pictures.

An incident this last week in Tucson can remind us of the dangers that surround us. Children at an early stage should be instructed in what is good and what is bed in nature. That is one reason why Dr. Bug teaches a class at the Chandler Environmental Education Center.

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Where will bees take up residence?

 

We all need to bee aware in Arizona and pretty much all of the South U.S. This is an example of why, this picture is a water meter box and if you look close you will see honeybees going in and out of the entrance . What would happen if children were playing and ran across the lid, or fell on the meter box?

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What would happen if you decided to check your water meter box and lifted the lid without seeing the bees, catastrophe well maybe? So please see the checklist below and use caution in and around your home!

  1. Check your home monthly especially in the Spring and Fall, check eaves and roof-line.
  2. Check your property, sheds and storage.
  3. Keep an eye out for meter boxes or electrical boxes.
  4. If a swarm enters your property and alights on a tree branch, wait – they may move. If they go to and from your home, then it is time to call.
  5. Remember bees don’t know a dog house from a tree.
  6. Remember if you decide to treat, you can’t call the bees back once they are excited and upset.

What is Anaphylactic shock?

What is Anaphylactic shock?

 

Anaphylaxis is a severe, whole-body allergic reaction to a chemical that has become an allergen. After being exposed to a substance such as bee sting venom, the person’s immune system becomes sensitized to it. It is estimated that more than 400 people die each year in the U.S. from bee stings.  This reaction can lead to difficulty breathing and shock ultimately leading to death.

  •  A single bee sting, for example, may not cause an allergic reaction the first time.
  •  Another bee sting may produce a sudden, severe allergic reaction known as anaphylaxis or anaphylactic shock.

Experts say that between 1% to 15% of the US population is at risk of having an anaphylactic reaction if exposed to at least one allergen – they add that these figures vary according to various definitions of a reaction. Approximately 1% of those with anaphylaxis may consequently die.

Only a very limited portion of the population (one or two out of 1000) is allergic or hypersensitive to bee or wasp stings. The average person can safely tolerate 10 stings per pound of body weight. This means that although 500 stings could kill a child, the average adult could withstand more than 1100 stings.

If you are unsure – call 911 immediately or Poison Control 1-888-222-1222 for more information.

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