All posts in “Transport”

How much termite pressure is on your home?

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Photo by FMC

So just how much pressure is on your home, that question is important and many factors play into this equation.

  1. If you live on the East Coast or Gulf of Mexico the pressure will be greater than if you lived up North. Yes you do have termites in the North but because of he extreme cold the pressure will be reduced.
  2. Water plays a big part of the pressure round your home. When people started to settle in Arizona they brought in non-native plants which required more watering. Flood and drip irrigation = humidity level goes up.
  3. We sometimes play right into the termites hand by building structures right where they live in the ground. We also allow wood to touch the ground, this really makes it easier on the termites.
  4. If you add onto your home insist on a pretreat, even if your build a shed pretreat the soil before the concrete slab goes into place.

Why is a termite pretreatment important?

 

Before you build that new home, the builder generally works a deal with a Termite Company to treat the soil beneath the slab is poured. There are lots of things that can go wrong and lets talk about a few.

  1. Scheduling conflicts and nobody shows up for pretreatment, you may or may not know this happens but it does.
  2. The builder uses the cheapest termiticide.
  3. After the builder does all the work and just after the termite company shows up and treats the soil, somebody decides that there are several pipes in the wrong place. Nobody calls the termite company with an update.
  4. After the termite technician treats soil, the building folks or plumbers walk over the product. I can’t tell you how many times this happened to me, I go crazy and they look at me like – who cares.
  5. The concrete people don’t remove all the form boards.
  6. The termite technician measures or calculates the square footage incorrectly.
  7. It was raining or rained very soon thereafter.

I run into various slabs or foundations that bewilder me on why there are termites so quickly into the houses life. Hire a reputable company and don’t fall for scams that sell pretreats for 3 or 4 cents per foot. Use or insist on a quality termiticide, if you use a quality product and company a pretreat should last. I was going to give a approximate number of years but I’m hesitant because of factors including soil, location of US and rainfall or water table heights. In Arizona I would think that a well performed with a quality termiticide  under the slab should last 15 years, the outside maybe, maybe 5  – 7 years. (my opinion)

Photo by PPMA

Photo by PPMA

Termite patching errors

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This is what happens when patching termites drill holes goes extreme. Patching termite drill holes should be limited to the hole not all the area around the hole. I caught this at a business site the other day and just thought it was amusing and actually sad.

 

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This is on pebble tech flooring, but so easy to just work a little smarter to blend in and only allow concrete to be in the hole not everywhere else.

Are termites on the prowl around your home?

Subterranean Termite Tube

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Termites are always on the lookout for water and some sort of wood, so they can eat. In Arizona inspect your home especially in the monsoon season when the rains come. The more irrigation or water increases your chances that you will see termites. They build these little tubes or tunnels to go from the ground up into your home.

About the only way sure way to control these termites is by placing a pesticide barrier between them and the wood, often this means hiring a Pest Management Professional. You need a complete exterior treatment and I suggest Termidor or Transport.

Bathrooms and Termites, why?

Bathrooms and Termites, why?

 

probestpestmanagementIMAG0208     probestpestmanagementIMAG0207

After learning about termites in Florida (I spent 8 years in Central Florida) I know that they really are drawn to water sources much like any animal or insect. Food, water and a place to live, that’s what they need and that’s what we need. So especially in Florida – abundant with water and bathrooms were the place I had more serious issues.

Here is Arizona I think the one thing that’s helps termites beyond the normal water, food etc is the footprint of homes. This footprint allows heat reduction and some water which allows termites to live within the shadow of us. So keep an eye peeled for signs of termites and you will be one step ahead of the game if they ever invade your home. Here is a list of things to look for:

  • Tunnels or tubes inside or out, inside could be very small but dirt is always present with Subterranean termites.
  • Drop tubes coming from your ceiling.
  • Baseboard that looks eaten from inside out, they won’t eat paint so it looks wrinkled.
  • I suggest an inspection by a Pest Management Professional – here is a great place to find one http://www.pestworld.org or just give ProBest Pest Management a call at 480-831-9328 or 623-414-0176

Tricky termite treatments

 

Tricky termite treatments

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Pavers, flagstone and tile always make a termite treatment more difficult. Sometimes it almost impossible, these pavers are in fact put in place with cement or sand.  It is possible to drill but it also is worrisome because you might crack the paver. It is essential to the treatment to get the termiticide to the area where the termites may try to get into the home.

I also run across built in cabinets and they pose another obstacle to getting the termiticide to that expansion joint. What other issues do you think we run across on our daily termite treatments and do you have any unusual obstructions at your home or business?

It’s the little things that matter in termite work!

It’s the little things that matter in termite work!

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One of the toughest things we do as a Termite treatment company is to drill holes and somewhat damage concrete.  So it is really important that we make the damage (holes) almost invisible. While we try our best sometimes it is an almost impossible task, but I think we do a fairly good job. Check out the photo’s above to see what you think. That is one reason why you should choose ProBest Pest Management.

Sometimes those termite tubes are huge…

Sometimes those termite tubes are huge…

 

It often amazes me when I see one home with a few dozen tubes or tunnels and then look next door and don’t see a single one. It could be that that home was treated but I’m not always sure especially if I don’t see any drill holes or evidence of any kind.  But the picture above is what to look for when inspecting your home for termites. If you see something like that I think it is time to call ProBest Pest Management!

Is there a difference between Patent and Generic Pesticides?

Is there a difference between Patented and Generic Pesticides?

 

I think all of us understand savings but I want to address patented pesticide/termiticide and exactly what they are, and how they are different from generic or post patent offerings.

Patent pesticide/termiticide is thoroughly researched and tested before they are brought to the market place. This scrutiny is more aggressive (in some ways) and very similar to pharmaceutical grade products.  Termiticides are tested at 4 sites across the U.S. and regulated by the USDA – Gulfport, MS, Tucson, AZ, Florida and South Carolina (USDA Report 2011) On average, it cost ~ $280 million from conception to shelf to commercialize a new pesticide. In addition to these R&D efforts, manufacturers conduct real world testing in various states with licensed Pest Management Professionals – such as ProBest Pest Management.

After a patent expires, generic companies purchase the rights to the active ingredients (ai) but are not entitled to the original pesticide formulation. This is critical because these formulation recipes are vital to product performance and stability.  Similar to pharmaceuticals, inferior inert ingredients are often used in the manufacturing of these products. You may ask, how can these products be the same?  The simple answer is, they are not.  I prefer to deal with basic manufacturers such as BASF (Termidor & Termidor HE ) or FMC Corporation (Talstar & Transport).  I trust their research and product stewardship and know that they would stand behind me if there was an issue.  By the way, I’ve seen this in action. These companies also spend a great deal of time training your local Pest Management Professionals on how to use these products and incorporate them into various termite treatments and protocols.

So before you purchase that termite treatment, ask a few questions: What pesticide or termiticide is the Pest Company using? Why have they decided to use that pesticide? What are their call back rates? Now, I’m sure there are many out there that would argue, generics are just as good as the mainstay offerings however, my opinion I prefer true quality and security for my customers. How do you feel about these generics?  I welcome your comments and concerns.

Premise versus Termidor or Transport

In 1995 Premise became available as the first non-repellent termiticide and it lead the way for non-repellents. So why the big deal? Most termiticides up to that point were repellents – generally when a termite came close to the product they were repelled and went away. That is unless there was an opening, then they just made their way into your home. The issue I have (my opinion) with Premise is that it is water solvable and can move within the soil. An interesting note about Premise is that it causes termites to stop feeding and to stop socializing with other termites. After those termites are exposed to even small amounts (very few parts per million) of Premise they wander around in a state of confusion until they eventually die. When large amounts of termites die in the same place, this may cause the termite to block and/or avoid those tunnels and make act as a repellent to other termites. The other issue is water solubility and that once in the ground there is reason to believe that it moves (see information below).

http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/emon/pubs/fatememo/Imidclprdfate2.pdf

These excerpts are taken from the pdf listed above and are the reason for my use of Termidor and Transport versus Premise.

Soil: The high water solubility and low Koc for imidacloprid indicates a low tendency for adsorption to soil particles. Field studies have produced a wide range in half-life values (t1/2) from 27 to 229 days (Miles, Inc., 1992; Mobay Chemical Corp., 1992). Scholz et al. (1992) found that imidacloprid degradation was more rapid in soils with cover crops than in bare soils, with a t1/2 of 48 and 190 days, respectively. Degradation on soil via photolysis has a t1/2 of 39 days. The half-life of imidacloprid in the soil tends to increase as soil pH increases (Sarkar et al., 2001). In the absence of light, the longest half-life of imidacloprid was 229 days in field studies and 997 days in laboratory studies (Miles, Inc., 1992; Mobay Chemical Corp., 1992). This persistence in soil in the absence of light makes imidacloprid suitable for seed treatment and incorporated soil application because it allows continual availability for uptake by roots (Mullins, 1993). Thus, imidacloprid can persist in soil depending on soil type, pH, use of organic fertilizers, and presence or absence of ground cover.

The leaching potential of imidacloprid when applied via chemigation was explored by Felsot et al. (1998). In this study, imidacloprid was applied to a fine sandy loam soil through a subsurface drip system installed in an experimental hops field. After seven days of irrigation applied at a depth of 0.38 cm of water per day, the insecticide was detected at the maximum sampled soil depth of 105 cm at concentrations as high as 120 ppb. Although the amount of irrigation water applied was not matched to local evapotranspiration and may have resulted in saturated soil, the study demonstrated the potential for imidacloprid residues to move downward through the soil with percolating water. Júnior et al. (2004) discovered that preferential transport through macropores might facilitate downward imidacloprid movement through heavy clay soils that are not normally considered conducive to leaching.

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