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Posts Tagged ‘CDC’

Plague and you, what to do?

 

So we interact with animals occasionally and we need to know how and when to react?  If your doing any work at a cabin up north and/or around your home, I always suggest gloves. With Valley Fever I also suggest a dust mask because you never know what you might kick up in the air.

Second New Mexico plague case reported”  “4 cases of Plague in Colorado” Maybe you are doing some work in your attic or crawlspace and you find something, how and what do you do?

As I mentioned wear gloves and a mask as a precaution, if you are cleaning and you notice feces – stop and follow guidelines for that type of cleanup. The Centers for Disease Control (CDC) http://emergency.cdc.gov/agent/plague/factsheet.asp

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Always better to be safe than sorry, take precautions and follow the guidelines on cleaning or if you see rodents on your property. Also Poison Control  1-800-222-1222 may have additional information on these topics.

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CDC reported cases of Lyme disease by state

 

CDC reported cases of Lyme disease by state or locality, 2003-2012

 

Lyme disease is caused by the bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi and is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, headache, fatigue, and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If left untreated, infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. Lyme disease is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks; laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. Steps to prevent Lyme disease include using insect repellent, removing ticks promptly, applying pesticides, and reducing tick habitat. The ticks that transmit Lyme disease can occasionally transmit other tickborne diseases as well. Check out the CDC site for more information.

Now I want to share something I thought was interesting – I tried to join a certain Arizona Lyme Disease yahoo forum and was denied. They claim that I tried to join before and I don’t recall but I thought they might be interested in possibly preventing the disease with these new tick boxes.  So there you go!

http://www.tickboxtcs.com/Select_TCS_Brochure.pdf

ticks

Bait Box Study by CDC

My Top 5 non-bug blogs

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I’ll bet you probably only thought that I read bug blogs, but no and here are my Top 5.

  1. Poison Control – http://aapcc.wordpress.com/
  2. Centers for Disease Control – http://blogs.cdc.gov/publichealthmatters/
  3. Frugal Dad Blog – http://frugaldad.com/
  4. American Legion Post 107 – http://www.alpost107.wordpress.com
  5. Successful Blogger – http://www.successful-blog.com/

Is there Lyme Disease in Arizona? YES!

 

According to CDC surveillance statistics, only 52 cases of Lyme disease have been reported in Arizona in the past 10 years. These statistics may be misleading. Reported cases reflect the “tip of the iceberg,” or only a fraction of the true cases. The CDC states there are approximately 30,000 reported cases of Lyme in the US, and acknowledges that it is under-reported by 10 fold.  This means that there are a minimum of 200,000 cases in the US that meet the CDC standard of diagnosis.

There are over 25 species of ticks in Arizona that may carry Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Tularemia, Babesia and tick fever, as well as Lyme disease. If the tick that bites you is infected, it can inject Lyme bacteria into your bloodstream within hours of attachment. The bacteria can  also invade your brain and nervous system in less than 24 hours.

There is a Arizona Lyme Disease Association and is there an answer – YES. As with any wildlife issue, there will almost always be a bug problem. Wildlife can be cute and can also carry diseases and parasites. So why not prevent the issue without harming the wildlife. How is this possible you say? Brochure Tick Control

Mouse

The mice or ground squirrels enter the box, feed on the non-toxic food and get a combing of fipronil on their fur. They can then carry this back to nest-mates and it absorbs into their skin, killing ticks or fleas that bite and suck their blood.

Here is another article “Lyme Disease in the U.S. is 10-times underreported.”

Certified Installers by State

My Top 3 reasons why you need pest control, or do you?

 

Pest control isn’t always needed at your home, but if you have issues you can either take care of it yourself or hire a Professional. I have written numerous blogs that categorically point out the advantages of hiring a pro for that job. There are those that believe that no matter the circumstance, it isn’t necessary to hire a professional. Here are the facts as I see them:

  1. You may need experience and expertise.
  2. Remember Bubonic Plague, Hanta Virus and other diseases are still present in the U.S. – “Rabbit test positive for Tularemia in Pueblo West, CO.”
  3. Not every job can be accomplished by stepping on the bug.

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