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Posts Tagged ‘ProBest Pest Management’

University of AZ – grant for $250,000 – Part 2

whatisipm

 How to do IPM?

  • Identify pests: not all creatures are pests. Proper identification helps you decide what to do about them.
  • Keep records: records give information about past pest problems, so you know when and where to look for them and what to do.
  • Keep pest away: maintain cleanness and deny food, water and shelter.
  • Non-chemical methods: managed pests by setting barriers, trapping, physical removal (by hand, vacuuming) or changing physical conditions (e.g. moisture, aeration) to make an area unfavorable for pests.
  • Use pesticides as the last resort: use least hazardous pesticides or application methods (self-contained baits, gels used as crack-and-crevice treatments, and exempt from U.S. EPA registration-25B). Use only if pests continue to be present and other methods are insufficient to manage the infestation. Regularly scheduled pesticide sprays are usually not necessary.
ProBest's Blog - Pest Control
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University of AZ – grant for $250,000 – Part 1

 

whatisipm

 

I recently attended the EPA Big Check event at the Metro Tech High School in Phoenix to witness the grant of $250,000 to the University of Arizona. I recently blogged “IPM – the way of the future, why don’t schools get this?“and again want to emphasize the benefits of IPM: This facility works this program to its fullest potential – Integrated pest management works inside & outside school buildings.

  • IPM reduces pest problems – this was very evident at Metro Tech as they support this to the highest degree.
  • IPM encourages the use of safer pesticides when needed.
  • IPM enhances the campus landscape and reduces plant and tree losses.
  • IPM creates a healthier campus for improved academic achievement & reduced absenteeism.
  • IPM can reduce athletic field injuries & pest-related asthma symptoms.
  • IPM is cost-effective.

This information was published as a program handout to the attendee’s and I thought would be valuable in spreading the news of IPM

Donations finally delivered to Big Brothers/Big Sisters of AZ

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We started collecting clothes and other stuff way back in December and we finally got around to calling Big Brothers/Big Sisters to pick it up. Long story but we kept collecting right up to the pickup and we have a small check to give them in regards to our cell phone collections. Good cause and one of my favorites – I had the chance to help 2 – 3 Little Brothers over my life and served on the Board of Directors of the Central Florida Chapter for close to 7 years.

Remember they will pick up – Call them at 602-230-8900 to donate clothes or for a donation. I would greatly appreciate it and I know they would as well. Thanks!

Another tick disease discovered

 

 

ticks

 

Two different farmers in Missouri have been diagnosed with Heartland virus with symptoms that include fever, fatigue and nausea. Back in 2013 we reported on CDC reported cases and we just want people to take precautions before hiking or going off into the woods. Lyme Disease in Arizona, Yes was another article we did on protecting yourself against ticks and fleas.  Take care hiking!

How do those scorpions get into your home?

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One of my favorite calls relates to how scorpions get into bathrooms or showers. People tell me they come up drains and that is incorrect. Arizona Bark Scorpions enter your home by crawling up stucco and gaining access into your attic. They then crawl around and under the insulation and finally they come to a recess light or something that was cut through the ceiling drywall. See all those cracks and if your home isn’t sealed well enough they will fall right into your house. Sometimes there are lights or fans right above the bath or shower and they just fall in. So here is my advice, pull down the plate that covers these holes and caulk the hole. This should be done on the top floor ceiling or if you live in a single story house the ceiling. On our website is a list of things we attempt to seal when we perform a Home-Sealing.

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